Thursday, March 15, 2012

How not to use Social Media

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Goldman Sachs

Guess your morning social feeds would have been inundated by the news of Greg Smith leaving Goldman Sachs and his damning revelation of the state of affairs in the organisation. On Greg's part, it is sad that he has to leave the organization after putting 12 years of efforts since joining as an intern.

With his article in the NYTimes Op-ed going viral, it does seem that people are interested in knowing what goes on at one of the most revered organisation as it concerns money. He has indeed stated that the culture & leadership is all concerned about making money, and moved away from its basic tenets of serving its customers to enable them make long term investment decisions, but my take is which organisation isn't into that. 

Unlike when he started 12 years back, the times have changed drastically now. These days people do want to make money fast and do not might getting battered for a while. That is the sentiment that helps organisations like Goldman Sachs & others run their business, so nothing wrong with it. End of the day, its all about "money".

But resorting to a public smear campaign leveraging social media was quite uncalled for. This issue could become a classic PR case & we would have ample bytes being written about it (I leave that to the experts).

Do utilize the comments panel below & share your take on the issue. I am still skeptical about supporting a disgruntled employee.

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